Where to Stream 2018’s Oscar-Nominated Movies

The 90th annual Academy Awards are rapidly approaching, but that doesn’t mean it’s too late to watch every (or most) Oscar-nominated movies. Of course, we understand how hard (and expensive) it is to drag yourself to the movie theater to watch dozens of movies the big ceremony. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t be an Oscar buff from your own home.

Believe it or not, tons of movies are streaming on platforms you might already own. All you need to do is turn on your Netflix, Amazon Prime, HBO Go, etc., and start bingeing. Come on. We know that you’ve been wanting to watch every Best Picture nominee for years, so why not make 2018 that year. Haven’t watched Oscar contenders such as “Mudbound” and “Get Out” yet? We have you covered.

‘Get Out’

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Nominated for: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Screen Play, Best Actor

As one of last year’s highest-grossing films, “Get Out” should be the first on any cinephile’s binge list. The horror follows an African-American photographer who visits his white girlfriend’s family for the weekend at their suburban home and finds out that the family reunion isn’t as welcoming as he assumed. Along with a nod for best picture, “Get Out” also earned Best Director and Best Original Screenplay nominations for writer-director Jordan Peele, and a Best Actor nomination for newcomer Daniel Kaluuya.

Available to stream on HBO Go.

‘The Big Sick’

Nominated for: Best Original Screenplay

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Written by “Silicon Valley” actor Kumail Nanjiani and his wife, Emily V. Gordon, “The Big Sick” follows a Pakistani-American stand-up comedian who is fighting his family’s disapproval of his interracial relationship when his white girlfriend falls into a coma. The script, inspired by Nanjiani and Gordon’s relationship, earned a nomination for Best Original Screenplay.

Available to stream on Amazon Prime.

‘Mudbound’

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Nominated for: Best Cinematography, Best Supporting Actress, Best Original Song, Best Adapted Screenplay

Directed by Dee Rees, “Mudbound,” adapted from Hilary Jordan’s novel of the same title, follows two World War II veterans—one white, one black—whose families become intertwined when they return to rural Mississippi. Along with nods for cinematography and adapted screenplay, the film earned two nominations for Mary J. Blige: Best Supporting Actress and Best Original Song for “Mighty River.”

Available to stream on Netflix.

‘The Boss Baby’

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Nominated for: Best Animated Feature

Starring the voices of comedy veterans including Alec Baldwin and Lisa Kudrow, “The Boss Baby” follows a baby secret agent who goes undercover to save the world from evil and stop an epic war between babies and puppies. Due to its adorability and tongue-in-cheek humor, the film naturally earned a Best Animated Feature nomination at the Oscars.

Available to stream on Netflix.

‘Beauty and the Beast’

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Nominated for: Best Production Design, Best Costume Design

This live-action remake of Disney’s 1991 animated film about a beautiful French country girl who falls in love with a curse-stricken prince when she accidentally trespasses in his castle stars Emma Watson and Dan Stevens. The film earned Oscar nominations for Best Production Design and Costume Design for its fantastical sets and wardrobes.

Available to stream on Netflix.

‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’

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Nominated for: Best Visual Effects

This sequel to Marvel’s superhero-packed 2014 films “Guardians of the Galaxy” checks back in with the Guardians, a rag-tag group of alien superheroes, as they accompany Peter Quill, a half-human also known as Star Lord, to learn more about a mysterious package. The film earned a nod for Best Visual Effects at the Oscars.

Available to stream on Netflix.

‘Kong: Skull Island’

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Nominated for: Best Visual Effects

This long-awaited reboot of “King Kong” stars Tom Hiddleston and Brie Larson as members of a team of scientists and a U.S. Army unit who travel to an uncharted island in the Pacific where they encounter Kong and many other scary creatures. The film earned an Oscar nomination for Best Visual Effects.

Available to stream on HBO Go.

‘Logan’

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Nominated for: Best Adapted Screenplay

The last in a trilogy following X-Men Wolverine’s life, “Logan” follows an aged Wolverine, a mutant with retractable claws and superhuman healing, and his extremely ill telepathic friend and mentor, Professor X, on their journey to protect a young mutant from villainous corruption. The film, which marks Hugh Jackman’s last time in the role, was nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Available to stream on HBO Go.

Gina Rodriguez Calls Out Oscars for Lack of Latino Representation

The 2018 Oscar nominations were announced on Tuesday, and though the nominations featured more diversity than previous years, actors of color like Gina Rodriguez still thought the recognized were #SoWhite. The 33-year-old actress took to Twitter to denounce the Academy Awards for its lack of Latino representation.

Though the “Jane the Virgin” star commended the Oscars for recognizing  Mexican director Guillermo del Toro and “Coco,” an animated film about a Mexican family, she expressed her disappointment over the majority white nominees. To show that she was more upset with lack of opportunities for Latinos in Hollywood than the nominations themselves, Rodriguez took a page from Viola Davis‘s 2015 Emmys speech, in which she expressed that the only thing that separates women of color from their peers is “opportunity.”

“How I feel about the #Oscars this morning and the lack of Latinos…’The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity’ -Viola Davis (Thank you @RealGDT and @pixarcoco for being our visibility),” Rodriguez tweetted.

Rodriguez recently took the entertainment industry to task at the 2018 SAG Awards, where she called out Hollywood for its lack of Latino leads—despite the huge consumers market coming from Latinos. “I mean, [Latinos and Latinas] do make 55 million plus in the country,” Rodriguez told E! News. “No big deal. You should throw us in a movie or two. It would make sense. We do buy one in every four tickets, every single weekend, and make sure that your movies do well.”

Rodriguez wasn’t the only actor of color who called out the Academy Awards. Constance Wu also took aim the Oscars for snubbing “Downsizing” actress Hong Chau, who is Vietnamese-American and would’ve the first Asian American actress nominated for an Oscar since 1994.

“Oh #oscars I am SO happy for @LadyBirdMovie and @GetOutMovie but u coulda nominated the brilliant #HongChau! How many Asian Americans have been nominated for Acting in the past decade??? Zero? I think it’s zero. And Chau was wondeful!!! Like……..???” Wu tweeted.

Yes—there are a lot of factors that go into a nomination and the Oscars aren’t the be all end all for recognition, but Rodriguez and Wu aren’t wrong. Just because the nominations weren’t entirely white doesn’t mean that there isn’t an issue. Props to Rodriguez and Wu for speaking out.